Home to some of the most important works of art and architecture, Rome is a city rooted in a rich history and culture that can’t be found anywhere else in the world. This also means buying tickets to see all the main tourist attractions can be expensive. But there are also plenty of free things to do in Rome. Follow this guide and you’ll enjoy a world-class experience of the Eternal City without spending a euro.
 

  1. Free Museum Sunday

    Source: Rome Wise

    On the last Sunday of the month, Rome's public museums, monuments, and historical sites are free to all visitors. Spend the day viewing the masterpieces of art and architecture that are part of the Vatican Museums. The collection includes the famous ceiling of the Sistine Chapel by Michelangelo.
     
  2. Ensure your return to Rome

    Source: Travel Addicts

    Legend has it that if you toss a coin over your shoulder into the Fontana di Trevi, you will return to Rome. Rome's largest and most famous Baroque fountain, it was designed by Nicollo Salvi in 1762. Visiting this cultural landmark is absolutely free.
     
  3. Climb the Spanish Steps

    Source: Doppergen

    The longest and widest staircase in Europe, the Spanish Steps is the site where Audrey Hepburn met Gregory Peck in Roman Holiday. A forewarning – this iconic site fills with tourists during the day. Plan your visit at night and enjoy a view of the illuminated Barcaccia Fountain at the foot of the stairs in the Piazza di Spagna.
     
  4. La Bocca della Verità

    Source: Upout

    Another monument made famous by Roman Holiday is La Bocca della Verità (the mouth of truth). For free, you can visit this menacing sculpture on the portico of the Church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin. According to legend, if you stick your hand in the sculpture's mouth and tell a lie, you'll pull out nothing but a stump.
     
  5. St. Peter's Basilica

    Source: Around de Globe

    You can visit St. Peter's Basilica, regarded as the center of the Catholic Church, for free. Many come here to make a spiritual connection, but the basilica is also home to great works of art. You'll find Michelangelo’s celebrated sculpture, the Pieta, and works by the revered Baroque sculptor Gian Lorenzo Bernini. However, there is an admission fee to enter the dome.
     
  6. The Pantheon

    Source: Antinous

    The best-preserved building from Ancient Rome, the Pantheon is one of the city's most important historical cites. The Pantheon was built by Emperor Hadrian between A.D. 118 and 125 as a temple for the Gods. For no cost at all, you can take in the structure's commanding facade. Step inside to stand beneath the dome as light filters in from the oculus at its center.
     
  7. The Arch of Constantine

    Source: Thousand Wonders

    The Arch of Constantine is the city's largest arch and was built by the great Roman emperor in A.D. 315 to commemorate his defeat over Maxentius. Constantine's triumph in A.D. 312 marked the beginning of Christianity in the Roman Empire. You can visit the arch and surrounding historical grounds for free.
     
  8. Piazza Navona

    Source: Portmobility Civitavecchia

    Spend an afternoon people watching at the Piazza Navona. Once the location for Rome's main market, the site fills daily with local artisans, street performers, musicians, and tourists alike. Here, you'll also find great art and architecture such as the Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi by Gian Lorenzo Bernini and the Sant'Agenese in Agone Church, by Francesco Borromini and Gerolamo Rainaldi.
     
  9. Villa Borghese

    Source: Pass2go

    This is a great place to go if you have kids. Named after the Borghese Family on the condition that it be the grounds for the most splendid villa in Rome, the Villa Borghese is one the few green spaces in the city. Enjoy an afternoon strolling this beautifully lush garden followed by a relaxing picnic. For amazing views of the city’s skyline and the Piazza del Popolo, trek to the point called “Pincio.”
     
  10. Appian Way

    Source: Young in Rome

    Dating back to the 5th century B.C., the Appian Way is known as ancient Rome’s “Queen of Roads.” Walking this picturesque stretch, you will see ruins that represent Rome’s distinguished history such as the tomb of Cecilia Metella, the Christian catacombs, and Circus Maximus.
     
  11. Outdoor Food Markets

    Source: Italian Cooking Adventures

    Rome is a city that prides itself on cuisine made from the freshest, most delicious ingredients. And these ingredients come from the city’s outdoor food markets. Spend a few hours watching how the locals shop for fresh fruits, vegetables, meats, and cheeses. Markets to check out are the Mercato Campo de’Fiori, Mercato Trionfale, Nuovo Mercato Esquilino, and the Mercato di Piazza San Cosimato.
     
  12. Gianicolo Hill

    Source: Wanted in Rome

    Gianicolo Hill is located just outside of Rome on the west of the Tiber. It rises just above the Vatican and Trastevere neighborhood to offer the most breathtaking view of Rome. Because it is located away from the bustle of the city’s center, your view is accompanied by peace and quiet. Except at noon when a cannon fires a single shot, a tradition that started in the 19th century.
     
  13. Trastevere

    Source: Portmobility Civitavecchia

    Located just across the Tiber, Trastevere is a charming neighborhood planned out in cobblestone streets and aged buildings. Spend a few moments in the piazza to watch street performers on the steps of the fountain. While walking the streets of Trastevere will not cost a thing, there are plenty of lovely cafés and restaurants around should you need to stop and refuel.
     
  14. Pyramid of Cestius

    Source: Portmobility Civitavecchia

    Built as a tomb for Gaius Cestius in 12 B.C., the Pyramid, or piramide, was modeled on Egyptian pyramids. Located near the Piramide Metro stop, this well-preserved structure from Ancient Rome is free to visit and your kids will love it.
     
  15. Capuchin Crypt

    Source: Rome Travel

    Located beneath the Church of Santa Maria della Immacolata Concezione, the Capuchin Crypt contains the skeletal remains of 3,700 monks. In 1631, The Capuchin monks started bringing the skeletons of deceased friars down to rest in the crypt’s six rooms. The bones are arranged in decorative motifs, and leave a lasting impression on all who view them.
     

The beautiful and grand city of Rome is filled with plenty to do at no cost to you. The next time you visit the city, make sure you have this list to guide you through an adventurous day. Also, don't forget to take a look at the Top 15 Things to Do in Rome to make the most out of your vacation.